Presto Custom Password Authentication Plugin (Internal)

Presto Authentication (Out of the Box)

Out of the box, presto will not make you authenticate to run any queries.  For example, you can just connect with JDBC from Java or DBeaver/etc and run whatever queries you want with any user name and no password.

When you want to enable a password, it has a few options out of the box:

So, unfortunately, if you just want to create some users/passwords and hand them out, or get users from an existing system or database, there really isn’t a way to do it here.

Custom Password Authenticator

Most things in Presto are implemented as plugins, including many of its own out-of-the-box features.  This is true for the LDAP authenticator above.  It actually is a “Password Authenticator” plugin implementation.

So, if we copy the LDAP plugin and modify it, we can actually make our own password plugin that lets us use any user-name and password/etc we want!  Note that we’ll just make another “internal” plugin which means we have to recompile presto.  I’ll try to make this an external plugin in another article.

Let’s Do It!

Note: we will be modifying presto code, and presto code only builds on Linux.  I use windows, so I do my work on an Ubuntu desktop in the cloud; but you can do whatever you like.  If you have a Linux desktop, it should build very easily out of Intellij or externally with Maven.

  1. Clone the presto source code.
  2. Open it in Intellij or your editor of choice.
  3. Find the “presto-password-authenticators” sub-project and navigate to com.facebook.presto.password.
  4. Copy LdapAuthenticator.java to MyAuthenticator.java.
  5. Copy LdapConfig to MyAuthenticatorConfig.java.
  6. Copy LdapAuthenticatorFactory to MyAuthenticatorFactory.java.
  7. For MyAutnenticatorConfig, make a password and a user private variable, both strings.  Then make getters and setters for them similar to the LDAP URL ones; though you can take out the patterns/etc.  You can remove everything else; our user name and password will be our only config.
  8. For MyAuthenticatorFactory, change getName() to return “my-authenticator”.  Also edit it so that it uses your new config class and so that it returns your new authenticator in config.
  9. For MyAuthenticator, just make the private Principal authenticate(String user, String password) {} method throw AccessDeniedException if the user and password don’t match the ones from your config.  You can get the ones from your config in the constructor.
  10. Add MyAuthenticator to the PasswordAuthenticationPlugin.java file under the LdapAuthenticatorFactory instance.

This is all the code changes you need for your new authenticator (assuming it works).  But how do we use/test it?

  • The code runs from the presto-main project.
  • Go there and edit config.properties; add these properties:
http-server.authentication.type=PASSWORD
http-server.https.enabled=true
http-server.https.port=8443
http-server.https.keystore.path=/etc/presto-keystore/keystore.jks
http-server.https.keystore.key=somePassword
  • Then add a password-authenticator.properties in the same directory with these properties:
password-authenticator.name=my-authenticator
user=myuser
password=otherPassword
  • Note that the password-authenticator.name is equal to the string you used in the factory class in step #8.
  • The first config file tells it to use a password plugin, the second one tells it which one to use based on that name and what extra properties to give to it based on the config (in our case, just a user and a password).

The Hard Part

Okay, so all of this was pretty easy to follow.  Unfortunately, if you go try to run this, it won’t work (Note that you can run the presto in IntelliJ by following these instructions).

Anyway, your plugin won’t work because password plugins don’t do anything unless you have HTTPS enabled on the coordinator.   This is because presto developers don’t want you sending clear-text passwords; so the password plugin type just makes it flat out not work!

We put properties in our first config file for HTTPS already.  Now you need to follow the JKS instructions here: https://prestosql.io/docs/current/security/tls.html#server-java-keystore to generate a key store and put it at the path from our config file.

Note that if you’re using AWS/etc, the “first and last name” should be the DNS name of your server.  If you put the IP, it won’t work.

Once you’ve got that set up, you can start presto and connect via JDBC from the local host by filling out the parameters noted here (https://prestosql.io/docs/current/installation/jdbc.html).

SSL Use HTTPS for connections
SSLKeyStorePath The location of the Java KeyStore file that contains the certificate and private key to use for authentication.
SSLKeyStorePassword The password for the KeyStore.

SSL = true, key store path is the one from the config file earlier, and the password is also the one from the config file.

Now, if you connect via JDBC and use the user name and password from your config file, everything should work!  Note that you probably want to get a real certificate in the future or else you’ll have to copy yours key store to each computer/node you use so JDBC works on each (which isn’t great).

UPDATE – 2019/08/04 – YOU should make clients use a trust store with the private key removed for numerous reasons.  See this newer post for how to take this JKS file and modify it for client use properly: https://coding-stream-of-consciousness.com/2019/08/04/presto-internal-tls-password-login-removing-private-key-from-jks-file/.

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